Sunday Supper, Some Mighty Tasty Ribs
Last night we hosted some folks for ribs. These special ribs came from a pig that I helped to raise, slaughter and butcher since the Spring. I have a freezer full of meat for the winter with everything from bacon to pork chops. I love knowing exactly where the pigs came from, what they ate and how they were treated.


On The Menu

Charcoal Seared Pork Ribs
served with traditional bbq sauce and pickled green beans

Aunt Diane’s Creamy Potato Salad
with crisp celery and fennel seeds

Fresh Picked Swiss Chard
sautéed with homemade bacon and seasonings

Cast Iron Corn Bread


How to prepare some mighty tasty ribs
Like much of my cooking, these ribs are simple to prepare. I began by rubbing each rack with salt, pepper, and garlic powder (1st photograph). I then placed the ribs on a sheet pan, added water to the bottom of the pan, covered the pan with aluminum foil and placed them in the oven. They baked at 275 degrees for about 5 hours, until tender. I checked the ribs a few times making sure they were covered and had liquid in the bottom of the pan to prevent drying (2nd photograph).

I prepared my Weber charcoal grill for indirect cooking. This means the hot coals are divided on two sides of the grill with a pan in between. The pan catches drippings from the meat as it cooks. At first, I cooked each rack directly over the coals. I was sure to turn the ribs over once to directly cook both sides. This step caramelized the meat, seared the outside and locked in the juices. I then moved the ribs to the center and covered the grill. The ribs cooked for about an hour and a half getting more tender and infusing the charcoal flavor (3rd photograph). I let them stand on the cutting board for a few minutes before cutting. I prefer to serve BBQ sauce on the side rather than on the meat. I believe the sauce should complement the taste of finely prepared BBQ and not be the primary flavor (final photograph). I would love to hear from anyone that has some ideas to make my ribs even better.

"There are old mushroom hunters and bold mushroom hunters but very few old and bold mushroom hunters"

I believe that these are Armillaria Mellea or Honey Mushrooms and happen to be edible.  However, I am not that bold of a mushroom hunter.

"There are old mushroom hunters and bold mushroom hunters but very few old and bold mushroom hunters"

I believe that these are Armillaria Mellea or Honey Mushrooms and happen to be edible. However, I am not that bold of a mushroom hunter.